Google buys Lytro for next to nothing.

Insiders at Google and Lytro are saying that the sale price of Lytro could be as little as $25m. Google is in talks with Lytro over its assets which include some 59 patients in light field and optical technologies.

Google buys Lytro

To much too soon for this Light-field pioneer.

Its a case of too much too soon, as the once shiny Lytro took to the front of the light field development scene. But then, Lyto’s consumer product flopped and expensive cracks started to appear. Not to say the company was wrong, but more a case of too soon for a market that was just not ready to support such ideas.

Typical, think back to the start of the web, have you even heard of Compuserve? No, well history seems to be repeating itself as early market entrants get overtaken, sold off or worse they simply fade out of business. [CompuServe was the first major commercial online service provider in the United States. It dominated the field during the 1980s and remained a major influence through the mid-1990s] Some of the companies at the front of the light-field, volumetric, 360, and VR race seem to be running out of fuel, meanwhile others, in some cases who may not be pushing the envelope so far, are seeing a rush of funding.

The world’s not a fair place, the tech world is down right savage. The sale of Lytro to Google is the start of a mopping-up wave that will see bigger companies harvesting the IP assets of these early pioneers. We feel quite sad as Lytro was indeed a true pioneer of what is today becoming the vital component of virtual experiences – the ability to see light and depth.

What will Google do with the Lytro technology? For the cost of the purchase, Google will probably just pass the IP into its own hardware developments, the learning itself is worth the cost, which could be as low as $25M. Even if the price of Lytro was double that, the hard work that the Lytro team have done over the past few years is like hitting a quick key, to the Google teams.

Why The VR Industry Needs to Re- Build The IT Channel

Mo-sys-startracker

Back in the 90’s creating strategies for the likes of IBM, Dell and Cisco, I found out the importance of having a good channel strategy. Everyone in IT knew that…

Without The Channel the IT industry would not have been able to rapidly serve the demands of a global market with physical products and services.

I firmly believe that its time for companies in the VR space to think about their channel strategy. Ask this, are you a manufacturer of VR hardware, a distributor of VR products, a software company, a Value Added Reseller or System Integrator?

Why the VR industry needs to re-build The Channel.

Continue reading “Why The VR Industry Needs to Re- Build The IT Channel”

Netflix only accept 4K footage for Original Productions

On Set Facilities On Set Colour Grading

A sign of our times, Netflix has firmly stated that it would only use 4K cameras for its original productions, which has been a source of frustration for some cinematographers, especially those that use ARRI gear and work on Netflix projects.

Post-production pipelines must also meet Netflix Original Productions 4K delivery requirements.

Re camera hardware Netflix says “The ARRI Alexa and Amira are fantastic cameras, and we stream plenty of content that was captured with these cameras. However, since these cameras do not have true 4K sensors, we cannot accept them for our 4K original productions.”

Netflix explains, “For those who pay a premium for our UHD 4K service, we only deliver content that was shot and delivered at a true UHD 4K resolution.”

Ultra HD. 4K UHD (2160p) has a resolution of 3840 pixels × 2160 lines (8.3 megapixels, aspect ratio 16:9) and is one of the two resolutions of ultra high definition television targeted towards consumers, the other being 8K UHD which is 7680 pixels × 4320 lines (33.2 megapixels).